Creating a Successful FinTech Company

The FinTech industry has grown exponentially over a relatively short period of time, and it shows no sign of stopping. Now, several young entrepreneurs are attempting to break into the FinTech industry. Their goal is to create an easier way to handle finances with technology and morph this way into an entire brand. However, not everyone goes about forming a new business the right way. Business owners must formulate a strategy that appeals to both potential funders of a company and a target market. The following are some questions to answer that will help you begin a successful FinTech brand.

What Is Your Niche?

Now that the FinTech industry is booming, there are hundreds if not thousands of companies trying to make money in the FinTech sphere. Therefore, you need to research the industry thoroughly. Figure out what people are doing well in the FinTech sphere, and what you can do better. Better yet, determine what FinTech customers are still looking for within the sphere. These tactics will give you the necessary knowledge to determine if your business is viable, and how to become a solution for your target market.

Is Your Idea Too Complicated?

FinTech is, obviously, a complicated technical sphere. However, the most successful companies are the ones that connect with the average user. This means being able to speak about your brand and product in simple terms. People are very set in their ways in terms of finances and banking; there are some who refuse to consider online money transfers as an option! Your potential users need to be able to understand how their money will be handled from start to finish.

Do You Have a Social Media Marketing Plan?

One of the biggest mistakes that new FinTech companies make is thinking they are outside the realm of normal entrepreneurial ventures. Even though FinTech is a relatively new industry, emerging FinTech companies should be treated on the marketing side like every other new business. This means having a social media strategy. You must build a community around your product through writing engaging content and interacting with users on social media. This is the most effective way to obtain customers.

How Will You Get People To Trust Your Company?

Having a niche, a marketing plan, and a simple business model is all helpful, but none of it will get you customers if your company is not deemed trustworthy. The easiest way to get people to trust your company is to partner with already-trusted influencers in the FinTech field. You can form a relationship with traditional banks, or connect with influencers and ask for their opinion and endorsement.  

Fintech Investments Soar

Since the start of the new year, entrepreneurs have been on edge. Venture capital seemed to be dwindling, which made business owners worry that any company they began would struggle to stay afloat. However, the past few months have shown that companies in the financial technology, or Fintech, sphere need not worry. Corporations and banks have been investing so much in Fintech startups that funding for said companies is higher than ever before.  

The amount of funding put into Fintech startups has doubled since 2015, reaching 13.8 billion dollars. Investments have stemmed mostly from the corporate sphere. Corporations invest in such startups in hopes to make their operations run more smoothly. Unfortunately, this increase in investments came at a cost. It surged because of stock performance by many Fintech startups that was lower than expected.

Therefore, banks and corporations all took part in deals for startups in order to expand their investment portfolios. One such bank is Citigroup, which is a well-known and established bank, that has thirteen startups in its investment portfolio. Other financial corporations backing several Fintech startups include Goldman Sachs and JPMorgan Chase. The investment in Fintech startups by banks and corporations is not just limited to the United States either. Corporations in Asia, for example, make up almost half of all investors in startups.

Investing in Fintech startups by financial corporations and banks bodes well for the future of finance all over the world. It shows a push in outdated financial institutions to adapt to modern times by incorporating new technology into their business models. It is paying off for customers already. Banks have developed applications for mobile devices that allow easier banking transactions, for example. Also, exchanging money digitally is as seamless as ever. Fintech innovation has even reached a point that stocks can be monitored and traded right from a technological device.

However, there is some uncertainty in Fintech startups, as they have become wary about the nature of the bank investments in their companies. They are, of course, thrilled that banks are dedicated to breaking into the digital age, but there is still a question as to whether or not the financial institutions will be good investors. Bank regulations are very limiting, and many such regulations prevent them from investing in innovative Fintech ventures.
Only time can tell how involved banks will be in Fintech startups in the future, but I hope they continue to take a large investing role. Moving all banking into the digital age is the only logical course of action in this day and age, and it has the ability to help everyone become more money-conscious.

The Trials of Being an Entrepreneur

The release of the most recent Star Wars film brings to mind the idea of the hero’s journey. The original Star Wars was predicated on Joseph Campbell’s Hero With a Thousand Faces, a work that explores the universal journey every human makes, be they Jedi’s, warriors, or even entrepreneurs. In the spirit of the hero’s journey, here’s a look at the trials and tribulations found in the journey of being an entrepreneur.


Becoming an entrepreneur can be a daunting prospect. Self-doubt is one of the first and biggest barriers to overcome. It’s very easy to not believe in your capabilities, to say “this is impossible,” “I can’t do this,” and “I’m doing this wrong.” It’s not uncommon for self-doubt to linger even into the later stage of business of ownership. Trust that this is just a phase. As you gain more experience and confidence you will find that doubt, like a rainy day, will eventually pass.

Setting Forth

When you first start planning for your company, you may find yourself possessed by a new-found sense of purpose. Everything you put on paper may seem possible. You may feel yourself buoyed by an overwhelming sense of positive energy. This is good and, if harnessed, it will carry you far. But often this newfound sense of optimism flees at the first sign of trouble. If that does happen, don’t worry. Just keep pushing onward.


When it rains, it pours. Entrepreneurship is a very demanding pursuit, and the challenges of it should not be underestimated. You will find yourself short on cash, needing to fill positions, missing projected goals and seeing the rise of major competition. During this time, it is completely natural to feel concerned, but you must try to channel this frustration into overcoming the obstacles that you face.


Rest assured, after spending several months of slogging through your first venture or after moving on to your third, you’ll eventually get the swing of things. You’ll be better able to take on any challenges that come your way, more smoothly negotiate with employees and investors, and crunch the numbers to get you where you need to be.


Even the most successful entrepreneurs face defeat at some point, whether it’s with an individual project or a whole venture. Failure is something to be embraced. Failure means that you are experimenting, that you’re taking risks, that you’re growing. As painful as it may be to experience failure, try to look at it as a growing pain.


After facing defeat, it is only a matter of time before you’re at it again. This is an exciting time. Not only are you getting back into the game, but you’re doing so with lessons learned from your previous experiences. With this new stage you may even find yourself going from Doubt to Confidence, skipping the stages of development in between. Even if your company fails several times, the total amount of experience gained will make a better, wiser entrepreneur out of you.


After years of Setting Forth and Defeat and Rebirth, you’ll eventually reach a state of equilibrium. The things that once rattled you no longer do so (well, maybe one thing will). Good decisions will become second-nature. You’ll have perspective on what failure means and how it can be converted to progress. At this point, you’ll be asset to any business you involve yourself with.

The article that inspired this piece can be found on